Tag Archives: snapshots

Notes from a talk on “Advanced snapshots with libvirt and QEMU”

I just did a talk at a small local conference (Infrastructure.Next, co-located with cfgmgmtcamp.eu) about Advanced Snapshots in libvirt and QEMU.

Slides are here, which contains URLs to more examples.

And, some more related notes here:

Advertisements

4 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

libvirt blockcommit: shorten disk image chain by live merging the current active disk content

When using QCOW2-based external snapshots, it is desirable to reduce an entire disk image chain to a single disk to retain performance and increase while the guest is running. Upstream QEMU and libvirt has recently acquired the ability to do that. Relevant git commits for QEMU (Jeff Cody) and libvirt (Eric Blake).

This is best illustrated with a quick example.

Let’s start with the below disk image chain as below for a guest called vm1. For simplicity’s sake:

[base] <-- [sn1] <-- [sn2] <-- [current] (live QEMU)

Once live active block commit operation is complete (step 5 below), the result will be a flattened disk image chain where data from sn1, sn2 and current are live commited into base:

 [base] (live QEMU)

(1) List the current active image in use:

$ virsh domblklist vm1
Target     Source
------------------------------------------------
vda        /export/images/base.qcow2

(2) For a quick test, create external snapshots. (And, repeat the above operation two more times, so we have the chain: [base] <– [sn1] <– [sn2] <– [current] )

$ virsh snapshot-create-as \
   --domain vm1 snap1 \
   --diskspec vda,file=/export/images/sn1.qcow2 \
   --disk-only --atomic

(3) Enumerate the backing file chain:

$ qemu-img info --backing-chain current.qcow2
[. . .] # output discarded for brevity

(4) Again, check the current active disk image:

$ virsh domblklist vm1
Target     Source
------------------------------------------------
vda        /export/images/current.qcow2

(5) Live Active commit an entire chain, including pivot:

$ virsh blockcommit vm1 vda \
   --active --pivot --verbose
Block Commit: [100 %]
Successfully pivoted

Explanation:

  • –active: It performs a two stage operation: first stage – it commits the contents from top images into base (i.e. sn1, sn2, current into base); in the second stage, the block operation remains awake to synchronize any further changes (from top images into base), here the user can take two actions: cancel the job, or pivot the job, i.e. adjust the base image as the current active image.
  • –pivot: Once data is committed from sn1, sn2 and current into base, it pivots the live QEMU to use base as the active image.
  • –verbose: Displays a progress of block operation.
  • Finally, the disk image backing chain is shortened to a single disk image.

(6) Optionally, list the current active image in use. It’s now back to ‘base’ which has all the contents from current, sn2, sn1):

$ virsh domblklist vm1
Target     Source
------------------------------------------------
vda        /export/images/base.qcow2

9 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

Live disk migration with libvirt blockcopy

[08-JAN-2015 Update: Correct the blockcopy CLI and update the final step to re-use the copy to be consistent with the scenario outlined at the beginning. Corrections pointed out by Gary R Cook at the end of the comments.]
[17-NOV-2014 Update: With recent libvirt/QEMU improvements, another way (which is relatively faster) to take a live disk backup via libvirt blockcommit, here’s an example]

QEMU and libvirt projects has had a lot of block layer improvements in its last few releases (libvirt 1.2.6 & QEMU 2.1). This post discusses a method to do live disk storage migration with libvirt’s blockcopy.

Context on libvirt blockcopy
Simply put, blockcopy facilitates virtual machine live disk image copying (or mirroring) — primarily useful for different use cases of storage migration:

  • Live disk storage migration
  • Live backup of a disk image and its associated backing chain
  • Efficient non-shared storage migration (with a combination of virsh operations snapshort-create-as+blockcopy+blockcommit)
  • As of IceHouse release, OpenStack Nova project also uses a variation of libvirt blockcopy, through its Python API virDomainBlockRebase, to create live snapshots, nova image-create. (More details on this in an upcoming blog post).

A blockcopy operation has two phases: (a) All of source disk content is copied (or mirrored) to the destination, this operation can be canceled to revert to the source disk (b) Once libvirt gets a signal indicating source and destination content are equal, the mirroring job remains awake until an explicit call to virsh blockjob [. . .] --abort is issued to end the mirroring operation gracefully . If desired, this explicit call to abort can be avoided by supplying --finish option. virsh manual page for verbose details.

Scenario: Live disk storage migration

To illustrate a simple case of live disk storage migration, we’ll use a disk image chain of depth 2:

base <-- snap1 <-- snap2 (Live QEMU) 

Once live blockcopy is complete, the resulting status of disk image chain ends up as below:

base <-- snap1 <-- snap2
          ^
          |
          '------- copy (Live QEMU, pivoted)

I.e. once the operation finishes, ‘copy’ will share the backing file chain of ‘snap1’ and ‘base’. And, live QEMU is now pivoted to use the ‘copy’.

Prepare disk images, backing chain & define the libvirt guest

[For simplicity, all virtual machine disks are QCOW2 images.]

Create the base image:

 $ qemu-img create -f qcow2 base 1G

Edit the base disk image using guestfish, create a partition, make a file-system, add a file to the base image so that we distinguish its contents from its qcow2 overlay disk images:

$ guestfish -a base.qcow2 
[. . .]
><fs> run 
><fs> part-disk /dev/sda mbr
><fs> mkfs ext4 /dev/sda1
><fs> mount /dev/sda1 /
><fs> touch /foo
><fs> ls /
foo
><fs> exit

Create another QCOW2 overlay snapshot ‘snap1’, with backing file as ‘base’:

$ qemu-img create -f qcow2 -b base.qcow2 \
  -o backing_fmt=qcow2 snap1.qcow2

Add a file to snap1.qcow2:

$ guestfish -a snap1.qcow2 
[. . .]
><fs> run
><fs> part-disk /dev/sda mbr
><fs> mkfs ext4 /dev/sda1
><fs> mount /dev/sda1 /
><fs> touch /bar
><fs> ls /
bar
baz
foo
lost+found
><fs> exit

Create another QCOW2 overlay snapshot ‘snap2’, with backing file as ‘snap1’:

$ qemu-img create -f qcow2 -b snap1.qcow2 \
  -o backing_fmt=qcow2 snap2.qcow2

Add another test file ‘baz’ into snap2.qcow2 using guestfish (refer to previous examples above) to distinguish contents of base, snap1 and snap2.

Create a simple libvirt XML file as below, with source file pointing to snap2.qcow2 — which will be the active block device (i.e. it tracks all new guest writes):

$ cat <<EOF > /etc/libvirt/qemu/testvm.xml
<domain type='kvm'>
  <name>testvm</name>
  <memory unit='MiB'>512</memory>   
  <vcpu>1</vcpu>
  <os>
    <type arch='x86_64'>hvm</type>
  </os>
  <devices>
    <disk type='file' device='disk'>
      <driver name='qemu' type='qcow2'/>
      <source file='/export/vmimages/snap2.qcow2'/>
      <target dev='vda' bus='virtio'/>
    </disk>   
  </devices>
</domain>
EOF

Define the guest and start it:

$ virsh define etc/libvirt/qemu/testvm.xml
  Domain testvm defined from /etc/libvirt/qemu/testvm.xml
$ virsh start testvm
Domain testvm started

Perform live disk migration
Undefine the running libvirt guest to make it transient[*]:

$ virsh dumpxml --inactive testvm > /var/tmp/testvm.xml
$ virsh undefine testvm

Check what is the current block device before performing live disk migration:

$ virsh domblklist testvm
Target     Source
------------------------------------------------
vda        /export/vmimages/snap2.qcow2

Optionally, display the backing chain of snap2.qcow2:

$ qemu-img info --backing-chain /export/vmimages/snap2.qcow2
[. . .] # Output removed for brevity

Initiate blockcopy (live disk mirroring):

$ virsh blockcopy --domain testvm vda \
  /export/blockcopy-test/backups/copy.qcow2 \
  --wait --verbose --shallow \
  --pivot

Details of the above command: It creates copy.qcow2 file in the specified path; performs a --shallow blockcopy (i.e. the ‘copy’ shares the backing chain) of the current block device (vda); –pivot will pivot the live QEMU to the ‘copy’.

Confirm that QEMU has pivoted to the ‘copy’ by enumerating the current block device in use:

$ virsh domblklist testvm
Target     Source
------------------------------------------------
vda        /export/vmimages/copy.qcow2

Again, display the backing chain of ‘copy’, it should be the resultant chain as noted in the Scenario section above).

$ qemu-img info --backing-chain /export/vmimages/copy.qcow2

Enumerate the contents of copy.qcow2:

$ guestfish -a copy.qcow2 
[. . .]
><fs> run
><fs> mount /dev/sda1 /
><fs> ls /
bar
foo
baz
lost+found
><fs> quit

(You can notice above: all the content from base.qcow2, snap1.qcow2, and snap2.qcow2 mirrored into copy.qcow2.)

Edit the libvirt guest XML to use the copy.qcow2, and define it:

$ virsh edit testvm
# Replace the <source file='/export/vmimages/snap2.qcow2'/> 
# with <source file='/export/vmimages/copy.qcow2'/>
[. . .] 

$ virsh define /var/tmp/testvm.xml

[*] Reason for the undefining and defining the guest again: As of writing this, QEMU has to support persistent dirty bitmap — this enables us to restart a QEMU process with disk mirroring intact. There are some in-progress patches upstream for a while. Until they are in main line QEMU, the current approach (as illustrated above) is: make a running libvirt guest transient temporarily, perform live blockcopy, and make the guest persistent again. (Thanks to Eric Blake, one of libvirt project’s principal developers, for this detail.)

16 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

OpenStack — nova image-create, under the hood

NOTE (05-OCT-2016): This post is outdated — the current code (in snapshot() and _live_snapshot() methods in libvirt/driver.py) for cold (where the guest is paused) snapshot & live snapshot has changed quite a bit. In short, they now use libvirt APIs managedSave(), for cold snapshot; and blockRebase(), for live snapshot.


I was trying to understand what kind of image nova image-create creates. It’s not entirely obvious from its help output, which says — Creates a new image by taking a snapshot of a running server. But what kind of snapshot? let’s figure.

nova image-create operations

The command is invoked as below

 $  nova image-create fed18 "snap1-of-fed18" --poll 

Drilling into nova’s source code — nova/virt/libvirt/driver.py — this is what image-create does:

  1. If the guest — based on which snapshot is to be taken — is running, nova calls libvirt’s virsh managedsave, which saves and stops a running guest, to be restarted later from the saved state.
  2. Next, it creates a qcow2 internal disk snapshot of the guest (now offline).
  3. Then, extracts the internal named snapshot from the qcow2 file & exports it to a RAW format and temporarily places in $instances_path/snapshots.
  4. Deletes the internal named snapshot from the qcow2 file.
  5. Finally, uploads that image into OpenStack glance service — which can be confirmed by running glance image-list.

Update: Steps 2 and 4 above are now effectively removed with this upstream change.

A simple test
To get a bit more clarity, let’s try Nova’s actions on a single qocw2 disk — with a running Fedora 18 OS — using libvirt’s shell virsh and QEMU’s qemu-img:

 
# Save the state and stop a running guest
$ virsh managedsave fed18 

# Create a qemu internal snapshot
$ qemu-img snapshot -c snap1 fed18.qcow2 

# Get information about the disk
$ qemu-img info fed18.qcow2 

# Extract the internal snapshot, 
# convert it to raw and export it a file
$ qemu-img convert -f qcow2 -O raw -s \
    snap1 fed18.qcow2 snap1-fed18.img 

# Get information about the new image
# extracted from the snapshot
$ qemu-img info snap1-fed18.img 

# List out file sizes of the original 
# and the snapshot
$ ls -lash fed18.qcow2 snap1-fed18.qcow2 

# Delete the internal snapshot 
# from the original disk
$ qemu-img snapshot -d snap1 fed18.qcow2 

# Again, get information of the original disk
$ qemu-img info fed18.qcow2 

# Start the guest again
$ virsh start fed18 

Thanks to Nikola Dipanov for helping me on where to look.

Update: A few things I missed to mention (thanks again for comments from Nikola) — I was using libvirt, kvm as underlying hypervisor technologies, with OpenStack Folsom release.

4 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

Creating rapid thin-provisioned guests using QEMU backing files

Provisioning virtual machines very rapidly is highly desirable, especially, when deploying large number of virtual machines. With QEMU’s backing files concept, we can instantiate several clones, by creating a single base-image and then sharing it(read-only) across multiple guests. So that, these guests, when modified will write all their changes to their disk image

To exemplify:

Initially, let’s create a minimal Fedora 17 virtual guest (I used this script), and copy the resulting qcow2 disk image as base-f17.qcow2. So, base-f17.qcow2 has Fedora 17 on it, and is established as our base image. Let’s see the info of it

$ qemu-img info base-f17.qcow2
image: base-f17.qcow2
file format: qcow2
virtual size: 5.0G (5368709120 bytes)
disk size: 5.0G
cluster_size: 65536
[root@localhost vmimages]# 

Now, let’s make use of the above F17 base image and try to instantiate 2 more Fedora 17 virtual machines, quickly. First, create a new qcow2 file(f17vm2-with-b.qcow2) using the base-f7.qcow2 as its backing-file:

$ qemu-img create -b /home/kashyap/vmimages/base-f17.qcow2 \
  -f qcow2 /home/kashyap/vmimages/f17vm2-with-b.qcow2
Formatting '/home/kashyap/vmimages/f17vm2-with-b.qcow2', fmt=qcow2 size=5368709120 backing_file='/home/kashyap/vmimages/base-f17.qcow2' encryption=off cluster_size=65536 lazy_refcounts=off 

And now, let’s see some information about the just created disk image. (It can be noticed the ‘backing file’ attribute below pointing to our base image(base-f17.qcow2)

$ qemu-img info /home/kashyap/vmimages/f17vm2-with-b.qcow2
image: /home/kashyap/vmimages/f17vm2-with-b.qcow2
file format: qcow2
virtual size: 5.0G (5368709120 bytes)
disk size: 196K
cluster_size: 65536
backing file: /home/kashyap/vmimages/base-f17.qcow2
[root@localhost vmimages]# 

Now, we’re set — our ‘f17vm2-with-b.qcow2‘ is ready to use. We can verify it in two ways:

  1. to quickly verify, we can invoke qemu-kvm (not recommended in production) — this will boot our new guest on stdio, and throws a serial console (NOTE: the base-f17.qcow2 had ‘console=tty0 console=ttyS0,115200’ on its kernel command line, so that it can provide serial console) —
    $ qemu-kvm -enable-kvm -m 1024 f17vm2-with-b.qcow2 -nographic
    
                              GNU GRUB  version 2.00~beta4
    
     +--------------------------------------------------------------------------+
     |Fedora Linux                                                              | 
     |Advanced options for Fedora Linux                                         |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          |
     |                                                                          | 
     +--------------------------------------------------------------------------+
    
          Use the ^ and v keys to select which entry is highlighted.      
          Press enter to boot the selected OS, `e' to edit the commands      
          before booting or `c' for a command-line.      
                                                                                   
                                                                                   
    Loading Linux 3.3.4-5.fc17.x86_64 ...
    Loading initial ramdisk ...
    [    0.000000] Initializing cgroup subsys cpuset
    .
    .
    .
    (none) login: root
    Password: 
    Last login: Thu Oct  4 07:07:54 on ttyS0
    $ 
    
  2. The other, more traditional way(so that libvirt could track it & can be used to manage the guest), is to copy a similar(F17) libvirt XML file, edit and update the name, uuid, disk path, mac-address, then define it, and start it via ‘virsh’:
    $ virsh define f17vm2-with-b.xml
    $ virsh start f17vm2-with-b --console
    $  virsh list
     Id    Name                           State
    ----------------------------------------------------
     9     f17v2-with-b                  running
    

Now, let’s quickly check the disk-image size of our new thin-provisioned guest. It can be noticed, the size is quite thin (14Mb) — meaning, only the delta from the original backing file will be written to this image.

$ ls -lash f17vm2-with-b.qcow2
14M -rw-r--r--. 1 root root 14M Oct  4 06:30 f17vm2-with-b.qcow2
$

To instantiate our 2nd F17 guest(say f17vm3-with-b) — again, create a new qcow2 file(f17vm3-with-b.qcow2) with its backing file as our base image base-f17.qcow2 . And then, check the info of the disk image using ‘qemu-img’ tool.

#----------------------------------------------------------#
$ qemu-img create -b /home/kashyap/vmimages/base-f17.qcow2
 &nbsp -f qcow2 /home/kashyap/vmimages/f17vm3-with-b.qcow2
Formatting '/home/kashyap/vmimages/f17vm3-with-b.qcow2', fmt=qcow2 size=5368709120 backing_file='/home/kashyap/vmimages/base-f17.qcow2' encryption=off cluster_size=65536 lazy_refcounts=off 
#----------------------------------------------------------#
$ qemu-img info /home/kashyap/vmimages/f17vm3-with-b.qcow2
image: /home/kashyap/vmimages/f17vm3-with-b.qcow2
file format: qcow2
virtual size: 5.0G (5368709120 bytes)
disk size: 196K
cluster_size: 65536
backing file: /home/kashyap/vmimages/base-f17.qcow2
$
#----------------------------------------------------------#

[it’s worth noting here that we’re pointing to the same base image, and multiple guests are using it as a backing file.]

Again check the disk image size of the thin-provisioned guest:

$ ls -lash f17vm3-with-b.qcow2
14M -rw-r--r--. 1 qemu qemu 14M Oct  4 07:18 f17vm3-with-b.qcow2

Goes without saying, the 2nd F17 guest also has a new XML file, defined w/ its unique attributes just like the 1st F17 guest.

$ virsh list
 Id    Name                           State
----------------------------------------------------
 9     f17vm2-with-b                  running
 10    f17vm3-with-b                  running

For reference sake, I’ve posted the xml file I’ve used for ‘f17vm3-with-b’ guest here

To summarize, by sharing a single, common base-image, we can quickly deploy multiple thin-provisioned virtual machines.


                      .----------------------.
                      | base-image-f17.qcow2 |
                      |                      |
                      '----------------------'
                         /       |         \
                        /        |          \
                       /         |           \
                      /          |            \
         .-----------v--.  .-----v--------.  .-v------------.
         | f17vm2.qcow2 |  | f17vm3.qcow2 |  | f17vmN.qcow2 |
         |              |  |              |  |              |
         '--------------'  '--------------'  '--------------'
            

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

External (and Live) snapshots with libvirt

Previously, I posted about snapshots here , which briefly discussed different types of snapshots. In this post, let’s explore how external snapshots work. Just to quickly rehash, external snapshots are a type of snapshots where, there’s a base image(which is the original disk image), and then its difference/delta (aka, the snapshot image) is stored in a new QCOW2 file. Once the snapshot is taken, the original disk image will be in a ‘read-only’ state, which can be used as backing file for other guests.

It’s worth mentioning here that:

  • The original disk image can be either in RAW format or QCOW2 format. When a snapshot is taken, ‘the difference’ will be stored in a different QCOW2 file
  • The virtual machine has to be running, live. Also with Live snapshots, no guest downtime is experienced when a snapshot is taken.
  • At this moment, external(Live) snapshots work for ‘disk-only’ snapshots(and not VM state). Work for both disk and VM state(and also, reverting to external disk snapshot state) is in-progress upstream(slated for libvirt-0.10.2).

Before we go ahead, here’s some version info, I’m testing on Fedora-17(host), and the guest(named ‘testvm’) is running Fedora-18(Test Compose):

$ rpm -q libvirt qemu-kvm ; uname -r
libvirt-0.10.1-3.fc17.x86_64
qemu-kvm-1.2-0.2.20120806git3e430569.fc17.x86_64
3.5.2-3.fc17.x86_64
$ 

External disk-snapshots(live) using QCOW2 as original image:
Let’s see an illustration of external(live) disk-only snapshots. First, let’s ensure the guest is running:

$ virsh list
 Id    Name                           State
----------------------------------------------------
 3     testvm                          running


$ 

Then, list all the block devices associated with the guest:

$ virsh domblklist testvm --details
Type       Device     Target     Source
------------------------------------------------
file       disk       vda        /export/vmimgs/testvm.qcow2

$ 

Next, let’s create a snapshot(disk-only) of the guest this way, while the guest is running:

$ virsh snapshot-create-as testvm snap1-testvm "snap1 description" \
  --diskspec vda,file=/export/vmimgs/snap1-testvm.qcow2 \
  --disk-only --atomic

Some details of the flags used:
– Passing a ‘–diskspec’ parameter adds the ‘disk’ elements to the Snapshot XML file
– ‘–disk-only’ parameter, takes the snapshot of only the disk
– ‘–atomic’ just ensures either the snapshot is run completely or fails w/o making any changes

Let’s check the information about the just taken snapshot by running qemu-img:

$ qemu-img info /export/vmimgs/snap1-testvm.qcow2 
image: /export/vmimgs/snap1-testvm.qcow2
file format: qcow2
virtual size: 20G (21474836480 bytes)
disk size: 2.5M
cluster_size: 65536
backing file: /export/vmimgs/testvm.qcow2
$ 

Apart from the above, I created 2 more snapshots(just the same syntax as above) for illustration purpose. Now, the snapshot-tree looks like this:

$ virsh snapshot-list testvm --tree

snap1-testvm
  |
  +- snap2-testvm
      |
      +- snap3-testvm
        

$ 

For the above example image file chain[ base<-snap1<-snap2<-snap3 ], it has to be read as – snap3 has snap2 as its backing file, snap2 has snap1 as its backing file, and snap1 has the base image as its backing file. We can see the backing file info from qemu-img:

#--------------------------------------------#
$ qemu-img info /export/vmimgs/snap3-testvm.qcow2
image: /export/vmimgs/snap3-testvm.qcow2
file format: qcow2
virtual size: 20G (21474836480 bytes)
disk size: 129M
cluster_size: 65536
backing file: /export/vmimgs/snap2-testvm.qcow2
#--------------------------------------------#
$ qemu-img info /export/vmimgs/snap2-testvm.qcow2
image: /export/vmimgs/snap2-testvm.qcow2
file format: qcow2
virtual size: 20G (21474836480 bytes)
disk size: 3.6M
cluster_size: 65536
backing file: /export/vmimgs/snap1-testvm.qcow2
#--------------------------------------------#
$ qemu-img info /export/vmimgs/snap1-testvm.qcow2
image: /export/vmimgs/snap1-testvm.qcow2
file format: qcow2
virtual size: 20G (21474836480 bytes)
disk size: 2.5M
cluster_size: 65536
backing file: /export/vmimgs/testvm.qcow2
$
#--------------------------------------------#

Now, if we do not need snap2 any more, and want to pull all the data from snap1 into snap3, making snap1 as snap3’s backing file, we can do a virsh blockpull operation as below:

#--------------------------------------------#
$ virsh blockpull --domain testvm \
  --path /export/vmimgs/snap3-testvm.qcow2 \
  --base /export/vmimgs/snap1-testvm.qcow2 \
  --wait --verbose
Block Pull: [100 %]
Pull complete
#--------------------------------------------#

Where, –path = path to the snapshot file, and –base = path to a backing file from which the data to be pulled. So from above example, it’s evident that we’re pulling the data from snap1 into snap3, and thus flattening the backing file chain resulting in snap1 as snap3’s backing file, which can be noticed by running qemu-img again.
Thing to note here,

$ qemu-img info /export/vmimgs/snap3-testvm.qcow2
image: /export/vmimgs/snap3-testvm.qcow2
file format: qcow2
virtual size: 20G (21474836480 bytes)
disk size: 145M
cluster_size: 65536
backing file: /export/vmimgs/snap1-testvm.qcow2
$ 

A couple of things to note here, after discussion with Eric Blake(thank you):

  • If we do a listing of the snapshot tree again(now that ‘snap2-testvm.qcow2’ backing file is no more in use),
$ virsh snapshot-list testvm --tree
snap1-testvm
  |
  +- snap2-testvm
      |
      +- snap3-testvm
$

one might wonder, why is snap3 still pointing to snap2? Thing to note here is, the above is the snapshot chain, which is independent from each virtual disk’s backing file chain. So, the ‘virsh snapshot-list’ is still listing the information accurately at the time of snapshot creation(and not what we’ve done after creating the snapshot). So, from the above snapshot tree, if we were to revert to snap1 or snap2 (when revert-to-disk-snapshots is available), it’d still be possible to do that, meaning:

It’s possible to go from this state:
base <- snap123 (data from snap1, snap2 pulled into snap3)

we can still revert to:

base<-snap1 (thus undoing the changes in snap2 & snap3)

External disk-snapshots(live) using RAW as original image:
With external disk-snapshots, the backing file can be RAW as well (unlike with ‘internal snapshots’ which only work with QCOW2 files, where the snapshots and delta are all stored in a single QCOW2 file)

A quick illustration below. The commands are self-explanatory. It can be noted the change(from RAW to QCOW2) in the block disk associated with the guest, before & after taking the disk-snapshot (when virsh domblklist command was executed)

#-------------------------------------------------#
$ virsh list | grep f17btrfs2
 7     f17btrfs2                      running
$
#-------------------------------------------------#
$ qemu-img info /export/vmimgs/f17btrfs2.img
image: /export/vmimgs/f17btrfs2.img
file format: raw
virtual size: 20G (21474836480 bytes)
disk size: 1.5G
$ 
#-------------------------------------------------#
$ virsh domblklist f17btrfs2 --details
Type       Device     Target     Source
------------------------------------------------
file       disk       hda        /export/vmimgs/f17btrfs2.img

$ 
#-------------------------------------------------#
$ virsh snapshot-create-as f17btrfs2 snap1-f17btrfs2 \
  "snap1-f17btrfs2-description" \
  --diskspec hda,file=/export/vmimgs/snap1-f17btrfs2.qcow2 \
  --disk-only --atomic
Domain snapshot snap1-f17btrfs2 created
$ 
#-------------------------------------------------#
$ qemu-img info /export/vmimgs/snap1-f17btrfs2.qcow2
image: /export/vmimgs/snap1-f17btrfs2.qcow2
file format: qcow2
virtual size: 20G (21474836480 bytes)
disk size: 196K
cluster_size: 65536
backing file: /export/vmimgs/f17btrfs2.img
$ 
#-------------------------------------------------#
$ virsh domblklist f17btrfs2 --details
Type       Device     Target     Source
------------------------------------------------
file       disk       hda        /export/vmimgs/snap1-f17btrfs2.qcow2
$ 
#-------------------------------------------------#

Also note: All snapshot XML files, where libvirt tracks the metadata of snapshots are are located under /var/lib/libvirt/qemu/snapshots/$guestname (and the original libvirt xml file is located under /etc/libvirt/qemu/$guestname.xml)

18 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

Snapshotting with libvirt for qcow2 images

Libvirt 0.9.6 was recently out. Take a look at 0.9.5 changelog for truckload of features/bugfixes/cleanups(specifically snapshot related) from the libvirt team.

So, I grabbed the F14 srpm from Libvirt ftp, and made a quick Fedora koji scratch build of libvirt-0.9.6 for Fedora 15 and gave the snapshot features a whirl. Here it goes:

(Also noted below is some very useful discussion I had(on #virt, OFTC) with Eric Blake (Upstream/Red Hat’s Libvirt dev, very friendly guy.) on snapshots. It was way informative not to capture it.)

Context on types of snapshots
At the moment, snapshotting in KVM/QEMU/Libvirt land is supported primarily for QCOW2 disk images. I briefly discussed about Qcow2 previously here.

There are several different types of snapshots possible. Some idea on that:

Internal snapshot: A type of snapshot, where a single QCOW2 file will hold both the ‘saved state’ and the ‘delta’ since that saved point. ‘Internal snapshots’ are very handy because it’s only a single file where all the snapshot info. is captured, and easy to copy/move around the machines.

External snapshot: Here, the ‘original qcow2 file’ will be in a ‘read-only’ saved state, and the new qcow2 file(which will be generated once snapshot is created) will be the delta for the changes. So, all the changes will now be written to this delta file. ‘External Snapshots’ are useful for performing backups. Also, external snapshot creates a qcow2 file with the original file as its backing image, and the backing file can be /read/ in parallel with the running qemu.

VM State: This will save the guest/domain state to a file. So, if you take a snapshot including VM state, we can then shut off that guest and use the freed up memory for other purposes on the host or for other guests. Internally this calls qemu monitor’s ‘savevm’ command. Note that this only takes care of VM state(and not disk snapshot). To try this out:

 
#------------------------------------------------
# Memory before saving the guest f15vm3
$ free -m
             total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
Mem:         10024       5722       4301          0        164       4445
-/+ buffers/cache:       1112       8911
Swap:            0          0          0
#------------------------------------------------
$ virsh list
 Id Name                 State
----------------------------------
  5 f15guest             running
  6 f15vm3               running
#------------------------------------------------
# Save the guest f15vm3 to a file 'foof15vm3'
$ virsh save f15vm3 foof15vm3
Domain f15vm3 saved to foof15vm3
#------------------------------------------------
# Now, f15vm3 is gracefully saved/shutdown.
$ virsh list
 Id Name                 State
----------------------------------
  5 f15guest             running
#------------------------------------------------
# Notice the RAM being freed
$ free -m
             total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
Mem:         10024       5418       4605          0        164       4493
-/+ buffers/cache:        760       9263
Swap:            0          0          0
#------------------------------------------------
# Let's restore the guest back from the file 'foof15vm3'
$ virsh restore foof15vm3
Domain restored from foof15vm3
#------------------------------------------------
# List the status. f15vm3 is up and running.
$ virsh list
 Id Name                 State
----------------------------------
  5 f15guest             running
  7 f15vm3               running
#------------------------------------------------

For brevity, let’s try out internal disk snapshots where all the snapshot info. (like disk and VM state info) are stored in a single qcow2 file.
Virsh(libvirt shell interface to manage guests) has some neat options for snapshot supports. So, I’ve got an F15 guest (Qcow2 disk image).

Internal Disk Snapshots when the guest is online/running

For illustration purpose, let’s use a Fedora-15 guest called ‘f15guest’ .

$ virsh list
 Id Name                 State
----------------------------------
  4 f15guest             running

$ 

For clarity, ensure there are no prior snapshot instances around.

$ virsh snapshot-list f15guest
 Name                 Creation Time             State
------------------------------------------------------------

$ 

Before creating a snapshot, we need to create a snapshot xml file with 2 simple elements (name and description) if you need sensible name for the snapshot. Note that only these two fields are user settable. Rest of the info. will be filled by Libvirt.

$  cat /var/tmp/snap1-f15guest.xml
<domainsnapshot>
    <name>snap1-f15pki </name>
    <description>F15 system with dogtag pki packages </description>
</domainsnapshot>

$ 

Eric Blake noted that, the domainsnapshot xml file is optional now for ‘snapshot-create’ if you don’t need a description for the snapshot. And if it’s okay with libvirt generating the snapshot name for us. (More on this, refer below)

Now, I’m taking a snapshot while the ‘guest’ is running live. Here, Eric noted that, especially when running/live, the more RAM the guest has, and the more active the guest is modifying that RAM, the longer the it will take to create a snapshot. This was a guest was mostly an idle guest.

$ virsh snapshot-create f15guest /var/tmp/snap1-f15guest.xml
Domain snapshot snap1-f15pki  created from '/var/tmp/snap1-f15guest.xml'
$ 

While the snapshot-creation is in progress on the live guest, the state of the guest will be ‘paused’.

$ virsh list
 Id Name                 State
----------------------------------
  4 f15guest             paused

$ 

Once, the snapshot is created, list the snapshots of f15guest

$ virsh snapshot-list f15guest
 Name                 Creation Time             State
------------------------------------------------------------
 snap1-f15pki         2011-10-04 19:04:00 +0530 running

$

Internal snapshot while the guest is offline

For fun, I created another snapshot, but after shutting down the guest. Now, the snapshot creation is just instantaneous.

$ virsh list
 Id Name                 State
----------------------------------

$ virsh snapshot-create f15guest
Domain snapshot 1317757628 created

List the snapshots of ‘f15guest’ using virsh.

$ virsh snapshot-list f15guest
 Name                 Creation Time             State
------------------------------------------------------------
 1317757628           2011-10-05 01:17:08 +0530 shutoff
 snap1-f15pki         2011-10-04 19:04:00 +0530 running

To see some information about the VM size, snapshot info:

$ qemu-img info /export/vmimgs/f15guest.qcow2
image: /export/vmimgs/f15guest.qcow2
file format: qcow2
virtual size: 8.0G (8589934592 bytes)
disk size: 3.2G
cluster_size: 65536
Snapshot list:
ID        TAG                 VM SIZE                DATE       VM CLOCK
1         snap1-f15pki           1.7G 2011-10-04 19:04:00   32:06:34.974
2         1317757628                0 2011-10-05 01:17:08   00:00:00.000
$ 

To revert to a particular snapshot, virsh snapshot-revert domain snapshotname

Also, discussed with Eric, in what cases does virsh invoke Qemu’s ‘savevm‘ and ‘qemu-img snapshot -c‘ commands while creating different types of snapshots discussed earlier above. Here is the outline:

  • it uses ‘qemu-img snapshot -c‘ if the domain is offline and –disk-only was not specified
  • it uses qemu’s ‘savevm‘ if the domain is online and –disk-only was not specified
  • it uses qemu’s ‘snapshot_blkdev‘ if the domain is online and –disk-only is specified

(Note: –disk-only is an option to capture only ‘disk state’ but not VM state. This option is available w/ virsh ‘snapshot-create’ or ‘snapshot-create-as’ commands.)

Thanks Eric for the detail.

18 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized